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20121202
20121210
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KQEH (PBS) 14
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English 14
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
closed doors on these changes to the law before they were introduced in statehouses across the country. >> the united states of alec. and perfidious and passionate poetry from philip appleman. >> money buys prophets and teachers, poems and art. so, listen, if you're so rich, why aren't you smart? >> funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york. celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fl
. margaret warner looks at what's at stake with marcia coyle of "the national law journal." >> brown: hari sreenivasan reports on the threat to the shellfish industry from coast to coast, as ocean temperatures rise and the waters are more acidic. >> this is a very dramatic change that has not been seen in the worlds oceans for more than 50 million years. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and gwen ifill sits down with michael beschloss, whose recent foray into the twitter-verse has opened up a new way to view history in the digital age. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: more people found work in november and more people stopped looking for work. as a result, the number of new jobs came in better than expected today and the rate of unemploym
state in the nation where recreational use of marijuana, by adults, is legal. the new law was approved by voters last month, and took effect at midnight. in seattle, about 100 people marked the occasion by smoking joints beneath the city's iconic space needle. technically, doing that in public remains against the law. marijuana is still illegal under federal law. but the justice department has not said if it will try to block the washington state law or a similar statute in colorado. same-sex marriage also became legal in washington state today, and in maryland. gay and lesbian couples in both states began picking up marriage licenses. those in washington state have to wait three days to be married. same-sex weddings in maryland will begin on january first. maine will legalize the practice on december 29. the three states are the first to approve same-sex marriage by popular vote. in economic news, new jobless claims fell sharply last week, after a temporary spike in the wake of hurricane sandy. and on wall street, stocks managed modest gains today. the dow jones industrial average add
school. >> narrator: fisher's organization lobbied successfully for laws that promote vaccine safety. today, a much safer vaccine has replaced dpt. the laws also created a special vaccine court to evaluate and compensate victims of adverse vaccine side effects. >> vaccines are pharmaceutical products that inherently carry a risk of injury or death. and that risk can be greater for some than others, particularly for... for genetic or biological high-risk reasons that have... some of which have been identified and some which have not been identified. >> shame on you, shame on you... >> narrator: surveys show about one-third of americans worry about rare but serious vaccine side effects. but one fear has come to dominate the vaccine war, the fear that vaccines are responsible for autism, a mysterious disorder that appears to be on the rise. the theory that vaccines could cause autism has become well known, partly due to the advocacy of vocal celebrities like jenny mccarthy and jim carrey. >> you're a shining example of unconditional love, and we're so proud to be here. >> jenny, jenny,
't read your email unless regulated by law. there are 33 instances of this in the constitution. it would be, of course, the parliament that writes the law. there's a lot of concern that isn't a longstanding clear contract between the people in the government but really another way for the brotherhood to expand its power grab here. >> brown: nancy yousef of mcclatchy in cairo, thanks so much. >> ifill: we'll continue our conversation series in the days to come. we get a very different take on this. paul krug man is a nobel prize winning economist at princeton university and a columnist for the "new york times." he joins us now. ers kin bowles may be one of the people you have written about in the past who you called deficit... who were touting a phantom menace known as the fiscal cliff. am i right about that? >> fiscal cliff is not a phantom menace. the deficit right now is. the notion that something terrible will happen if we don't deal with the deficit right away. the fiscal cliff is a very different story. that's about reducing the deficit too fast. >> ifill: you call it an austerity b
clinton. but now, president obama's man at the fcc -- they were friends in law school -- apparently wants to do what the republicans couldn't do under president bush, and to do it behind the scenes, out of sight, with no public hearings. several public interest groups, civil rights organizations and labor unions opposed the move, and last week, senator bernie sanders and several of his colleagues called on chairman genachowski to hold off. bernie sanders is an outspoken opponent of media consolidation. he sees it as a threat to democracy. once the mayor of burlington, vermont, he served 16 years in the house of representatives and was recently re-elected to his second term in the senate. he's the longest serving independent in the history of congress. he was in new york earlier this week and we met for this interview. welcome. good to see you again. >> good to be with you, bill. >> this is a strong letter, inspired one of your colleagues in the senate says, by you. what's the beef? >> what the chairmanf the fcc is now talking about is making a bad situation much worse by loosening up the
counterpart tom daschle. the two did something called compromise. a concept that facilitates law foreign in today's congress. watch. >> i had a red phone where when i picked up that phone, it rang only one place. on tom daschle's desk. and when he picked it up, i knew i was talking to tom daschle. not his staff. not my staff. sometimes he and i lead when our conferences were not ready to move. i remember i called one time i called him, i stepped out from a conference meeting and tom you know we need to do this, i'm having problem and he said i am too, let's go, i will see you on the floor. we went up on the floor of the senate, we called the bill up and passed it by sundown. you got to do that every now and then even though you might catch a little flash from those in your conference. it is called leadership, anderson. >> just to clarify, a red phone was on republican leader trent lott's desk and a red phone was on leader tom daschle desk. when the red phone rang on daschle's desk, he knew it was lott. and when lot's phone rang, he knew it was daschle. both. and why can't both chame beve
warned the syrian government not to use chemical weapons on its people. online, an update to a law in saudi arabia renews a debate about male guardianship. hari sreenivasan has more. >> sreenivasan: now whenever a saudi woman leaves the country, her husband or father receives a text message. the recent changes to the long- held system of male guardianship sparked outrage on twitter recently. i spoke to a journalist in saudi arabia who says the practice reinforces male control. our conversation is in the rundown. today's science roundup features dragonflies, or as one science writer calls them "the bengal tigers of the microworld." find the story on our home page. how can you secure a larger social security payment from an ex-spouse? the answer is in this week's installment of "ask larry." all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. gwen? >> ifill: and that's the newshour for tonight. on tuesday, we'll look at turkey's request for nato to deploy patriot missiles along its border with syria. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. we'll see you online, and again
most of which at some point in time is going to become law. and the longer we put this off, the deeper the hole gets, so we're trying to focus on how do we get this done now-- >> woodruff: let me ask you about part of your plan. part of it would means test social security, medicare benefits. in order, the benefits would go down for those at the higher income levels. we had the economist paul krugman on the "newshour" last night who said that, you know, not only do the polls show many american oppose, this but he said the benefit you get, the money that would be raised from doing that is really not enough to overcome the pain that he said it would cause lower and middle-income americans. >> well, first of all, it would cause no pain to lower and middle-income citizens because they wouldn't be affected. and i agree, it's only one of the things that needs to occur. it's a small part. there are many manager transformative things that need to happen in social security and medicare and my bill outlines both transformative things to really make them solvent. there's a $27 trillion unfund lieb
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)